Faith In The Storm

Faith In The Storm by Kirk Hunt

Then He arose and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace, be still!” And the wind ceased and there was a great calm. But He said to them, “Why are you so fearful? How is it that you have no faith?

Mark 4:39-40 NKJV

Did Jesus need to calm the storm? Since the boat was sinking, His interference in the natural course of events was welcomed by the Disciples. Still, the need or desire for God to intervene in circumstances is not an excuse to lose (or set aside) your faith.

God is God, all of the time. Not even a series of circumstances can exceed God’s sovereignty or mastery of creation. You might be in over your head, but God remains above everything. He is the final authority of all time, space and situations.

Keep and guard your faith, no matter how fierce the storm. Since God is always omniscient, omnipotent and omnipresent, your inconveniences are never an issue for Him. Your faith should be based on Him, not what is going on around you.

Jesus rebuked the storm. Then He rebuked the Disciples. Their concern about the storm was reasonable and to be expected. Their sudden loss of faith was a failure to think and act on their understanding of God and the presence of Jesus.

No matter how difficult the situation, God is your source. Keep your faith strong. The Master is more than equal to your storm.

Think: In the middle of the storm, my faith remains in God.

Pray: “Lord, help me to keep my eyes and faith on You.”

Copyright © March 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

In The Storm

In The Storm by Kirk Hunt

And a great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that it was already filling. But He was in the stern, asleep on a pillow. And they awoke Him and said to Him, “Teacher, do You not care that we are perishing?”

Mark 4:37-38 NKJV

Simon, Andrew, James, and John were not rookies, afraid of a strong breeze.    They were professional fishermen who earned good livings, with this kind of boat, on this very body of water.    They were expert, seasoned sailors and knew watercraft well.    They had all been through storms before. This storm was different.

They did not panic, at first.    They did what they knew to do.    They used their professional skills and extensive experience to weather the storm.   

They bailed water.    They shortened the sails.    They lightened the ship.    All to no avail.

The Disciples woke Jesus.    Big, burly men who, until now, had seen everything the Galilee could throw at them.    Strong, tough guys, who were way past their limits. And knew it.    They could do nothing, but they knew someone who could do anything.

In the middle of the crisis, the Disciples turned to the Master of Storms.   

Do what you know to do, but call out His Name.    Use your skills and abilities, but look to Christ for the solution.    Act, but rely on Jesus.    When we reach our limit, God’s Power begins.

The wind will howl.    The waves will crash.    Is the Master of Storms in your boat?

Think: In the middle of the storm, Jesus is my safety and comfort.

Pray: “Lord, thank You for how You protect and preserve me.”

Copyright © January 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

…And Worshiped Him

…And Worshiped Him by Kirk Hunt

And when they had come into the house, they saw the young Child with Mary His mother, and fell down and worshiped Him. And when they had opened their treasures, they presented gifts to Him: gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

Matthew 2:11 NKJV

They spent months trekking across hundreds (or thousands) of miles. They braved dangers from violent weather, wild animals or armed marauders to find Jesus. Then, despite their wealth, education, wisdom and stations, they threw themselves on the stable floor, before the newborn King of Kings. And worshiped Him.

They came. They saw. They worshiped.” At great cost. At great inconvenience. At great risk. The Wise Men lived out a lifestyle of worship.

In the hustle and bustle, have you carved out a place and space for worship? When last did your worship of Jesus really cost you? How long has it been since your worship of Immanuel (God With Us) was truly inconvenient? How much risk has there been, or will there be, in the worship you give to the King of Kings?

The various services and ceremonies Christians use as worship are nice and good. Unfortunately, they can become mechanical and rote. If you are not careful, you may come to think that is all there is to your worship of Jesus.

Real worship comes from the depth of your heart. True worship takes you out of your zone and into His. The best worship involves risk as you invest the best of yourself in recognition of all that is Jesus, your Savior.

The wise men set aside their comfort, safety and dignity to worship Jesus. When last did you do the same? When next will you worship Jesus with your all?

Think: Does my lifestyle truly worship Jesus?

Pray: “Lord, help me to live in a lifestyle of worship of You at all times.”

 

Copyright © December 2018, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

They Worshiped Him

They Worshiped Him By Kirk Hunt

And when they had come into the house, they saw the young Child with Mary His mother, and fell down and worshiped Him. And when they had opened their treasures, they presented gifts to Him: gold, frankincense, and myrrh.

Matthew 2:11 NKJV

Waves of men crowded into the little barn to give reverence to a child cradled in a feeding trough. The shepherds likely came first, especially considering they received divine declaration of the Savior’s birth. The magi calculated His birth through the stars and prophecies, then came at great expense to recognize His importance. However they learned of Christ’s birth, they came and worshiped Him.

The shepherds, lowly even among the common folk, likely gave gifts limited to sincere hearts, bowed in awestruck wonder. The magi were able to add valuable and tangible gifts to their worship, but ultimately they worshiped Him just as the shepherds did. Early or late, formally educated or practically trained, they worshiped Christ the same way. Their hearts were humbled before the King of heaven.

As you consider Him this Christmas, think about the manger. Thank Him for a grace that would endure humble circumstances. God gave the ultimate Gift wrapped in literal rags. Jesus surrendered the glories of Heaven to endure the human condition.

He lived as a mere man among common people, His royal lineage little more than a technicality. By coming as the least of these, He ensured that all men gained complete and unhindered access to the throne of God. Before He had a chance to reconcile men to God, wise men, shepherd or magi, worshiped Him.

Like the magi, or the shepherds, I pray you have found Him and are wise enough to worship Him. Understand that you do not come to Him empty-handed. The most important gift He wants is a heart that rejoices in Him and adores His presence.

Give your gifts. Mere goods do honor Him. Your heart, on the other hand, delights Him.

Think: No matter how I know, I know He is Lord and Savior.

Pray: “Lord, accept the gift of my heart.”

 

Copyright © December 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.