Where Is Your Pleasure?

Where Is Your Pleasure? by Kirk Hunt

And for this reason God will send them strong delusion, that they should believe the lie, that they all may be condemned who did not believe the truth but had pleasure in unrighteousness.

2 Thessalonians 2:11-12 NKJV

Too often, the truth hurts me. I may flinch, but I refuse to turn away. I have to work hard for it, but I always seek to find pleasure and joy in God’s truth. His truth always brings life and increase for His sons and daughters.

You can always take pleasure in the lies. They are, after all, easier to hear. Unfortunately, the lies always lead to death, loss, and condemnation.

Ask a drug addict. Ask anyone deep in debt. It was fun at first, but the pain and hurt outweigh the temporary pleasures.

The preacher said, God will only save you from your enemies, not your friends.” God can separate you from an addiction, but you have to want to be clean and stay sober. God can separate you from the lies, but you have to want His truth.

If you want His truth, all you have to do is ask. You may have to work hard to find joy and enjoyment in God’s truth. When you are living in His grace and blessing, it will be worth it.

Think: Do I love God’s truth? Do I find pleasure in His truth or the lie?

Pray: “Lord, help me to love and take pleasure in Your truth.”

Copyright © September 2021, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

And Swallowed Them

And Swallowed Them by Kirk Hunt

Now it came to pass, as he [Moses] finished speaking all these words, that the ground split apart under them [the rebels], and the earth opened its mouth and swallowed them up, with their households and all the men with Korah, with all their goods.

Numbers 16:31-32 NKJV
Please read also Numbers 16:1-40

Korah’s rebellion against Moses had a deadly, clear-cut resolution. The dirt beneath the feet of the rebels and mutineers split open, swallowed them, then closed again. The mutineers, their family members, and even their possessions, disappeared in a moment. Please read Numbers 16:1-40 for the complete account.

Why did Korah rebel against Moses? At Jude 1:11, Korah’s rebellion is associated with other notorious sinners and their sins of greed: Cain the brother slayer; Balaam the spiritual sell-sword. Whatever his reasons, Korah, and 250 other men, were destroyed with their families. No one could deny their destruction as a clear move of God. Whatever their motivations, God judged their actions with harsh finality.

There was time between the start of the rebellion and their punishment by God. I believe there was time and opportunity (Numbers 16:16, 23-24) for Korah or his mutineers to repent and receive mercy. Instead of confessing error and sin, the rebels pushed ahead to God’s sovereign judgment.

Often, men and women get minutes, or hours, to confess before God and withdraw from their sin and rebellion. Too often, rebels push ahead to God’s final and very public judgment. In this pause, have you re-considered what you are doing?

Think: Father-God am I in Your will, or am I in rebellion?

Pray: “Lord, help me to be in Your Will and not in rebellion against You.”

Copyright © November 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Naaman The Honorable

Naaman The Honorable by Kirk Hunt

Now Naaman, commander of the army of the king of Syria, was a great and honorable man in the eyes of his master, because by him the Lord had given victory to Syria. He was also a mighty man of valor, but a leper.

2 Kings 5:1 NKJV

Despite being a general in the army of the pagan Syrians, Naaman was an instrument of God’s will. Being a great and honorable man (or woman) does not mean you are sinless. Leprosy, long a symbol or analogy of sin in human lives, changed the viewpoint of others. Naaman’s grateful king (historically, Ben-Hadad II) saw him less as a national hero and more as a dangerous threat to his own health and wellbeing.

Even today, Naaman’s leprosy can serve as an object lesson: Being good and moral is not enough. Christians, God’s people, must live more than clean lives. We must live separate from the sin that can so easily taint and contaminate our lives.

Despite all of his achievements and benefits to the Syrian King and nation, Naaman lived as a separated pariah. Even his wife would have shunned his immediate presence, or merest touch. Naaman’s bacterial infection defined him more than his courage, valor or noble character.

The sin in your life defines you more than your generosity, virtue or clean living. Some souls who see your taint and contamination will shun you as one of the unredeemed. Other souls will seek to drag you further into the worst of sinful living.

Leprosy, the disease, can be cured. Sin, the corruption of your soul, can be cleansed and avoided through the salvation of Jesus Christ. I pray you are honorable, but know it is more important to be sinless.

Think: Honorable is good. Sinless is better.

Pray: “Lord, help me to live sinlessly through Your Holy Spirit and power.”

 

Copyright © February 2019, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.