These My Brethren and Sistren

These My Brethren and Sistren by Kirk Hunt

“Then the righteous will answer Him, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see You hungry and feed You, or thirsty and give You drink? When did we see You a stranger and take You in, or naked and clothe You? Or when did we see You sick, or in prison, and come to You?’ And the King will answer and say to them, ‘Assuredly, I say to you, inasmuch as you did it to one of the least of these My brethren, you did it to Me.’”

Matthew 25:37-40 NKJV

Some people see marauding invaders. Others see plague bearers. God’s faithful should see brothers and sisters. Jesus called them brethren (and sistren).

I have a sister and three brothers. I have been very annoyed at all of them, at one point, or another. Still, in the middle of our greatest disagreements, I would never let any of them go hungry or lack shelter. How could I even bear to think of Momma or Poppa if I mistreated one of my siblings?

God loves all of the men and women who cross over a border, regardless of the papers they do, or do not, carry. Whether fleeing a violent criminal gang or a devastating storm, a refugee is one of Jesus’ siblings. When you stand before God’s throne how will you explain your treatment of men and women that Jesus loves?

God’s people are commanded by Jesus himself. “Care for those in need.” Do not check their credentials. Refuse to look at how do, or do not worship. Comfort and support them because they are Jesus’ siblings.

Think: I am commanded to care for those in need by Jesus Himself.

Pray: “Jesus, help me to serve Your brothers and sisters.”

 

Copyright © September 2019, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Except This Foreigner?

Except This Foreigner? by Kirk Hunt

So Jesus answered and said, “Were there not ten cleansed? But where are the nine? Were there not any found who returned to give glory to God except this foreigner?”

Luke 17:17-18 NKJV

They kept their distance per the Law but that did not stop them from calling out to Jesus for mercy. They were lepers, men still alive, but rotting to death. Jesus sent them to the priests to be declared clean of their living putrefaction. None said thank you for their miraculous healing, “except this foreigner.”

He could not take another step. His slow, cruel death sentence had been lifted. His desperate separation from friends and family was ended. His days of being despised and feared were over.

How could you not be grateful? Why would you refuse to thank God for the enormous mercy and miraculous goodness you had just received? Looking at his restoration, this nameless foreigner knew the priests could wait. His gratitude on the other hand, could not.

So he did what the native-born would not. He ran to Jesus and kneeled to Him in thankfulness. The same voice that cried for mercy now cried out glory to God.

All ten received the same miracle blessing. All ten had their miserable and degrading suffering ended through healing and restoration. Only the foreigner, the man who should not have received anything, bothered with gratitude or appreciation.

What mercy have you received? What mercy have you given? Did you show gratitude to God for the privilege given to you or through you?

Think: God’s mercy is for native-born and foreigner alike. Am I grateful for what I receive?

Pray: “Lord, help me to give and receive Your mercy freely, and with gratitude.”

 

Copyright © August 2019, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Cast Your Bread

Cast Your Bread by Kirk Hunt

Cast your bread upon the waters,
For you will find it after many days.
Give a serving to seven, and also to eight,
For you do not know what evil will be on the earth.

Ecclesiastes 11:1 NKJV

Too often we worry too much about ourselves. We are God’s people. We are the sheep of His hand. If we trust God, should we also worry or hoard His blessings? Go ahead and cast your bread on the waters of circumstance.

I get it. For a season, I fretted about something I had to give. I give in faith and amazingly enough, I have never run out. God taught me to give and trust Him to give again. The people I served and blessed with my gift? A bonus, over and above the approval of my God.

God commands our open, giving hands, and promises our hands will gather again. And give again. The advantage of giving per God’s Word is that He always provides more for us to give. It can get to the point where we give out before His provision does.

First, we must act in faith, and purpose. Then we must work in patient expectation. Finally, we receive again. God promised we will find more provision in the days to come, if we first give to others.

God has already given to you. Will you give to others? Your obedience will please Him and bless you.

Think: God promises that if I give, I will also receive. Do I really trust God?

Pray: “Lord, help me to freely give per Your commands.”

 

Copyright © July 2019, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Gifts To The Poor

Gifts To The Poor By Kirk Hunt

To establish among them that they should celebrate yearly the fourteenth and fifteenth days of the month of Adar,   as the days on which the Jews had rest from their enemies, as the month which was turned from sorrow to joy for them, and from mourning to a holiday; that they should make them days of feasting and joy, of sending presents to one another and gifts to the poor.

Esther 9:21–22 NKJV

The Jewish holiday of Purim is a time of joy and celebration.  Haman’s conspiracy was thwarted and Mordecai personally promoted by King Ahasuerus.  Yet, in all of the feasting and festivity, gifts to the poor were intended to be a part of Purim.

Too often those who are doing well give no thought about those who are struggling.  You may not be able to erase all of their suffering or difficulty, but you can share your joy.  Joy and celebration is not a zero-sum game.  You and they can win, simultaneously.

Were the poor at risk from Haman’s plot?  Yes, just like wealthier folk.  Life and liberty are precious commodities, regardless of your income level.  Was their salvation from Haman’s conspiracy any less precious?  Not one iota less than other folk.

Consider the things you enjoy, the privileges you experience, and the benefits you receive.  Is it really so difficult or onerous to share from all that God has provided to you?  After all, sharing increases joy in the world.

God has blessed you.  Consider how you can pass His blessings on to others, as Jesus commanded.  Give your gifts, especially to those less fortunate.  Joy, divided and distributed, gets larger, not smaller.

Think:        I can share my joy, especially with those who are less fortunate.

Pray:           “Lord, help me to remember to bless others in Your Name.”

 

Copyright © July 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.