Yet He Passed Away

Yet He Passed Away by Kirk Hunt

I have seen the wicked in great power,
And spreading himself like a native green tree.
Yet he passed away, and behold, he was no more;
Indeed I sought him, but he could not be found.

Psalm 37:35-36 NKJV
Please also read Psalm 37:1–40

Too often, I despair that the wicked are winning. I have caught myself fretting that the ruthless and unscrupulous are being established, never to be dislodged. Then, suddenly, they pass away and can not be found, even if you wanted to see them.

I am not the first God-follower to think so. Psalm 37, written by David, speaks to my own concerns. The wicked may indeed prosper for a season, but not they shall not triumph. No matter how it looks now, God’s justice is on the way.

In my own life, I have seen men and women suddenly receive justice. Before, it seemed the wicked ones were immune to the laws of God and man. After, I trembled at the thoroughness of God’s sovereign and merciless justice.

On bended knee, I pray that I live in obedience to His Word and law. I never want to be the one that God’s people cry out against. I want always to be found, doing Kingdom work the way God wants it done.

Play it straight, since God is watching. Follow God’s Word and law, the way you know it should be done. His sword of justice is quick, terrible and not to be denied by mere humans.

Think: The wicked will receive justice, sooner and more thoroughly than you think.

Pray: “Lord, help me to be found at all times as Your obedient servant.”

 

Copyright © April 2019, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

And Marched Around

And Marched Around By Kirk Hunt

But it came to pass on the seventh day that they rose early, about the dawning of the day, and marched around the city seven times in the same manner. On that day only they marched around the city seven times.

Joshua 6:15 NKJV
Read also Joshua 6:15–20

To the untrained eye, Joshua was wasting everyone’s time and energy. Israel marched around Jericho, 14 times in silence. There were no shouts of triumph or defiance. Only the sound of trudging feet could be heard, unless the people of Jericho were hurling insults and taunts from the top of the walls.

Israel built no siege engines. Teams of sappers did not undermine the walls. Instead, Joshua and Israel were obedient to God’s instruction. “March. Then march some more.”

Perhaps you are facing a Jericho wall in your life. It is a circumstance that is big, blocks your way, and you see no way to overcome it. I implore you: Keep marching.

God’s people obey God, whether or not it makes sense to us. We insist on persistence. We patiently keep doing what He said, until our change comes. We compel ourselves to act out our faith in His Word. No matter how many laps it takes.

Too often, we obey conventional wisdom rather than God. We expect financial, political or numbers of people to carry the day. While it is good to be prepared to do the hard word, it is better to follow God’s instructions.

Even if your feet are sore, continue marching per God’s instructions. When God gets through, your Jericho wall will fall. Be read for the hard work to follow your victory.

Think: I will patiently persist at my God-given task until my Jericho wall falls.

Pray: “Lord, help me to act my faith in Your Word for my life.”

 

Copyright © September 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

After Admonition

After Admonition By Kirk Hunt

Reject a divisive man after the first and second admonition, knowing that such a person is warped and sinning, being self-condemned.

Titus 3:10-11 NKJV

Admonition can be defined as authoritative counsel or warning. Nathan’s confrontation of David (2 Samuel 12:1-15) is a definitive example of how to correct even a powerful leader. Just as important, even the powerful should respond correctly to truth-speakers. Paul, speaking to Titus, plainly states there are limits to the effort to help men and women who are in error.

David’s Israel was wealthy and militarily powerful. Still, Nathan appeared in David’s throne room and rebuked him for his sin and error. Success or good performance in one area of your life is not an excuse for sin anywhere in your life.

David, thankfully, had the wisdom and imperfect righteousness enough to respond with confession and repentance. No one is so perfectly righteous, or extraordinarily wise, that they never need authoritative counsel or warning. With all of his power and authority, King David meekly and obediently accepted Nathan’s rebuke. David then patiently endured his (painful) process of repentance and restoration.

Christian men and women do not give up on someone the first (or second) time it gets hard. On the other hand, Jesus Himself said, “Go and sin no more.” Grace is not a “continue to sin” card.

Titus, on Crete, led folk who tended to go their own way, instead of following God’s path. Paul the Apostle provided clear instructions on how to handle divisive men and women. Sooner or later you will give the rebukes, or take the rebukes. How will you act in that day?

Think: After being admonished, do I, or others, sincerely seek to make a change?

Pray: “Lord, help me accept admonishment as one of Your righteous men or women.”

 

Copyright © August 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.