Healing in The Spit

Healing in The Spit by Kirk Hunt

When He had said these things, He spat on the ground and made clay with the saliva; and He anointed the eyes of the blind man with the clay. And He said to him, “Go, wash in the pool of Siloam” (which is translated, Sent). So he went and washed, and came back seeing.

John 9:6-7 NKJV

Faced with a blind man, Jesus chose to make mud with His own spit then anointed the man’s eyes. Some would call Jesus’ actions humiliating. The blind man called those same actions healing. Too often, we are more concerned with the means rather than the outcome.

Healing the man’s blindness was the important part. The means of healing were far less important. So the blind endured having spit and mud rubbed on his eyes. He obediently followed Jesus’ instruction to wash his face in a specific location.

The blind man wanted to see. The indignity of his healing quickly gave way to the joy of vision. The price of God’s process is a bargain, considering the outcomes He gives.

Perhaps you feel that God has anointed your life with muddy spit. Maybe You feel humiliated as you follow His instructions to parade around in public before cleaning off the mud. God’s process does not always make sense to us, but His outcomes are always a blessing.

Follow His process and receive His ordained outcome. Your obedience is the price you must pay to receive His blessings. In the end, you will consider the whole process a bargain.

Think: Regardless of the means God chooses, it is the outcome that is important.

Pray: “Lord, help me to see what You doing, not how You are doing it.”

Copyright © March 2021, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Bearing With Each Other

Bearing With Each Other by Kirk Hunt

Therefore, as the elect of God, holy and beloved, put on tender mercies, kindness, humility, meekness, longsuffering; bearing with one another, and forgiving one another, if anyone has a complaint against another; even as Christ forgave you, so you also must do.

Colossians 3:12-13 NKJV

Bearing with people is not easy. Folk can be so wrong, so annoying, and so in need of a slap in the head. Instead, we are commanded to treat the worst of them with forbearance which consists of patience, courtesy and dignity. This is so important that the apostle does not frame it as a request.

Keep in mind that folk, at their best, rarely change in a moment. Even when they want to badly. During the transition, they need friends, family and saints to stay with them as they do the work and follow the process.

So, with the rebels or lawbreakers disarmed and at your feet, you are commanded. Show them your best patience. Give them your sincerest courtesies. Blanket them with your richest dignity. Prove that you are one of God’s selected saints.

Somewhere in there, you will need to forgive them. For yourself, not for them. Forgiveness makes your work with and towards them lighter and easier.

Follow the forbearance commandment whether they ask for forgiveness, or not. Because you are commanded to love and forgive others as Christ forgave and loves you. And when you find yourself receiving patience, courtesy and dignity, do the math.

Think: Forbearance is a commandment to God’s people.

Pray: “Lord, help me to be forbearant with everyone, especially other saints.”

Copyright © November 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.