God Speaks, Good Happens

God Speaks, Good Happens by Kirk Hunt

“Those who regard worthless idols
Forsake their own Mercy.

“But I will sacrifice to You
With the voice of thanksgiving;
I will pay what I have vowed.
Salvation is of the Lord.”

So the Lord spoke to the fish, and it vomited Jonah onto dry land.

Jonah 2:8-10 NKJV

God’s prophet finally responded correctly. Jonah spoke his contrition, worship, praise and thanksgiving to the God of mercy and love. So God spoke and His prophet landed face first on the beach, alive and well (if chastened).

God is a god of mercy and love. God’s mercy refused to burn Jonah down on the dock. God’s love refused to let him drown in the sea. Then, as now, God loves all of His children, not just the well-behaved kids.

God is also a god of justice and righteousness. His righteousness refused to let Jonah be willful and disobedient. God’s justice delivered correction to His prophet for his sin and rebellion.

Spitting sand out of his mouth, Jonah stood, still a prophet of God and still loved by Him. No matter what you have done, God is waiting for you to repent. His correction is part of His love. His forgiveness is prepared and waiting for you.

Earthly fathers, imperfect as they are, love their wayward children. Father-God is perfect and His love for us is without limit or restraint. When will you go back to Him and repent? When will you accept what He has waiting for you.

Do your part. God will speak His part and it will happen for you. Never mind any sand you have to spit out.

Think: After I repent God will speak good into my life.

Pray: “Lord, thank You for continuing to love me.”

 

Copyright © February 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

No Eyes, Clear Sight

No Eyes, Clear Sight By Kirk Hunt

Then the Philistines took him and put out his eyes, and brought him down to Gaza. They bound him with bronze fetters, and he became a grinder in the prison.

Judges 16:21 NKJV

The mill stones crushing the grain would have made a low, steady growl in Samson’s ears. In weather hot and dry, or cold and wet, Samson did the work of a horse. Or mule. Or ass.

Either in haunting silence or with a chorus of tormentors, Samson walked his circle in darkness. The man who had once burned Philistine grain fields now made flour for them. I am certain the irony was not lost on Samson or his Philistine captors.

Do not be angry at the Philistines: Samson’s life had been shrouded in darkness for years. Samson’s lust, willfulness and disobedience had long since blinded him to God’s truth and call. The Philistines, heathen foreigners, should have been guided to God by Samson. Instead, Samson’s lack of spiritual vision became his lack of literal vision.

Blinded and in prison, Samson finally saw the light. Chained to a millstone, he was free to spend time with God. Despite all he did wrong, Samson still remembered the correct way to love God.

God had not abandoned Samson. When Samson finally figured out his own errors, God was there. Arms open. Restoration was just a prayer away.

Samson is named as a hero of faith in Hebrews 11. Despite his mistakes and errors, he returned to God. God always faithfully restores the truly repentant. No matter how dark it seems, you are not alone. God is waiting, arms open, to restore you.

Think: God is faithful and constant, even if I am not.

Pray: “Lord, forgive me. Lord, restore me.”

 

Copyright © October 2018, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Buying Reconciliation

Buying Reconciliation By Kirk Hunt

But Esau said, “I have enough, my brother; keep what you have for yourself.” And Jacob said, “No, please, if I have now found favor in your sight, then receive my present from my hand, inasmuch as I have seen your face as though I had seen the face of God, and you were pleased with me.

Genesis 33:9–10 NKJV

The murderous hatred of Esau did not soften; instead, it transformed into brotherly love. Not suddenly with gifts, but slowly in the two decades of separation from his twin brother. Whatever Jacob’s opinion of Esau before, he is delighted by his brother’s acceptance in reconciliation. “You were pleased with me.”

Reconciliation is rarely a complicated business. Restoring relationships is almost always a lavishly expensive affair. The cost in swallowed pride and forgiven offensives starts high, then grows with each passing day. Unwinding, or flat forgiving, old grievances can take more out of you than you think or know.

Jacob’s wealth and blessings could not buy off his conscience or wrongdoing. He had to face his brother and fix their relationship. Unsure of his brother’s response (400 men), Jacob faced the regional warlord with nothing but courage and determination.

The fortune in livestock Jacob gave to Esau was not a bribe. It was an apology. Esau’s embrace of Jacob restored peace and joy, too long absent between them. Tears, of joy and relief, marked the return of brothers to each other’s life.

It is not too late or too hard for you. Spend your time, money and tears on reconciliation. Use your every skill and resource to restore the relationship. It will be a bargain at twice the price.

Think: Reconciliation is expensive but satisfying.

Pray: “Lord, help me find the way to bring us back together.”

 

Copyright © April 2018, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.